Power Steering-Range Rover


Steering Pump/Box-

 http://www.zf-group.com/pdf/steering 

 http://www.zf-group.com/pdf/steering/TROUBLESHOOTING.PDF

Steering Boxes-Meridian Rebuilders

 

 

 


Steering Box-

To: rangie-l@bigyellowdesign.com
Subject: Re: [RR] HAS ANYONE EVER REPLACED THE SEALS IN A STEERING BOX?
 

--- "Davis, William R. [ROA]" <williamdavis@trigon.com> wrote:


Hi all,
I have a 1984 RR classic...I have to have new seals in the steering
box-the
problem is I cannot find ANYONE who will/can do it.
 
_____________________________________________________
When I replaced the seal on my 86 Rangie about a year ago I used a pressed metal sleeve into which the seal was squeezed. The whole lot was then inserted into the box, and the sleeve removed with the seal staying behind. It gets the seal past the circlip groove without damage. I borrowed the sleeve from the local LR mechanic. He got it from the seal suppliers.
 
You do have to remove the old seal first, though. Just start the motor and move the steering wheel once you have the pitman arm off and the circlip out. Very efficient, and very messy!
 
Its not a hard job, just oily and messy. You do need a VERY hefty puller - I used an hydraulic one - and when you replace the nut it must be VERY tight.
 
Willem
www.willemzz.com
www.aussiesheepskin.com
_______________________
 
Dale Smith wrote:
 
There was someone on the lists two or three years ago that talked about
a fix that was used in Aus. Somehow they used a sleeve and pressed the
new seal in on top of the old one. Was supposed to be good for another
30K. Sorry but I don't remember any more.
Cheers
Dale
To: "'rangie-l@bigyellowdesign.com'" <rangie-l@bigyellowdesign.com>
Subject: RE: [RR] HAS ANYONE EVER REPLACED THE SEALS IN A STEERING BOX?
 
Hello,
 
I did the input seal last year august. It was leaking like crazy.
After removing airfilter I loosened the universal joints from the
steeringcolumn (after that they can slide to give room to slide the end off
the inputshaft. I removed the old seal and cleaned the remainders carefully.
with a piece of paper around the splines of the inputschaft for protection I
put the new one around it.

I did not manage to get the OEM seal past the circlip groove.
Not even with the homemade sleeve so (don't tell anyone!) I left the circlip
off!
I must say It still holds and has not leaked ever since.
 
Aside from the circlip-wrestling It's no biggie.
 
Succes!
 
Regards
 
Olav
 
-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van: Willem Schultink [mailto:willem@willemzz.com]
Verzonden: donderdag 31 januari 2002 9:28
Aan: rangie-l@bigyellowdesign.com
Onderwerp: Re: [RR] HAS ANYONE EVER REPLACED THE SEALS IN A STEERING
BOX?

When I replaced the seal on my 86 Rangie about a year ago I used a
pressed metal sleeve into which the seal was squeezed. The whole lot was
then inserted into the box, and the sleeve removed with the seal staying
behind. It gets the seal past the circlip groove without damage. I
borrowed the sleeve from the local LR mechanic. He got it from the seal
suppliers.
 
You do have to remove the old seal first, though. Just start the motor
and move the steering wheel once you have the pitman arm off and the
circlip out. Very efficient, and very messy!
 
Its not a hard job, just oily and messy. You do need a VERY hefty puller
- I used an hydraulic one - and when you replace the nut it must be VERY
tight.

Willem
www.willemzz.com
www.aussiesheepskin.com
_______________________

===========================================================
I did this successfully a while back - here's the write-up...
 
Hello friends, I just completed the replacement of the power steering output
shaft seal. I had heard that it would be a problem job and to plan for a
lengthy amount of time to complete it. My findings were somewhat different.
I got the seal kit from "my friends" at British Pacific (shameless plug!)
for just over $30.
 
The huge nut holding on the drop arm was tight, but not that tight. I didn't
have a large enough socket to fit, so I used the "king sized" crescent
wrench (spanner) that I have, approximately 18" long. It worked with no
problem. Next came separating the drop arm from the splined shaft to which
it had been attached to for the past 13 years. This turned out to be the
most difficult task. I tried the cheesy (cheap $5) puller that I owned, but
only managed to bend the puller arms. In disgust, I ran to Sears and bought
a decent $30 puller. (guaranteed "forever.") This took some extreme force,
using an 18" long breaker bar turning the bolt on the puller before finally
a LOUD BANG!!! And I flinched to the sound of pieces falling on the
concrete. When I opened my eyes, I discovered that the drop arm had finally
released itself from it's long lived and intimate acquaintance with the
splined output shaft!
 
Next, I put the shaft back, only finger tight, and started the Rover and
turned the wheels to put pressure on the seal and force it out. Worked
excellently! (Thanks for the tip whoever it was - Ron Beckett maybe?)
 
Adding the new seal turned out being just a bit tricky (how to get a flared
seal into a hole that is smaller than the diameter of the seal!) I tried the
"cellophane wrap on the splines" trick to protect the seal during
installation, but this didn't help and seemed to only get in the way and
bunch up, so I abandoned that idea. I tried using a wire tie to compress the
flare of the seal so I could insert it... no go. After several unsuccessful
attempts with a variety of contortions that Rube Goldberg would have been
proud of, I finally just pushed the edge of the flared seal in with a
screwdriver and worked my way all around until I finally got the whole lip
into the opening. Time consuming and tedious, but not rocket science.
 
Then, I had to figure a way to drive the seal into the deep opening without
damaging it. After scrounging the contents of my (cluttered) garage, I came
up with an old plastic sprinkler head that was just the right size after
removing the innards of this sacrificial volunteer. A few gentle taps and
all set.
Next, I had to decide if the "green bible" was correct in the order of
installation of all the bits, or go with common sense. The book shows the
following order: 1. Main seal, 2. Metal backed 2nd seal, 3. Dust boot, and
lastly, 4. The C clip. Also, to the best of my recollection (which, granted,
is pretty scary for me!) the dust boot came last AFTER the C clip. In the
end, reason won out, and I put the C clip next to the strong metal backed
2nd seal and covered the whole mess with the dust boot.
 
End result - NO LEAKS! YEE-HAA!!!
 
Time: Approximately 3 hours including farting around with a cheesy puller
and going to Sears to get a decent one.
 
If any of you Arizona Rover owners need a decent puller to do this (or other
Rover work) I now have one you can borrow. (Heck, If I have the time I'll
even help you with it!)
 
Regards, Dave Brown
 
Dave Brown - Gilbert, Arizona - '87 Range Rover "Chimera" 4.6L engine - With
"stuff"
It's never over in a Rover!

============================================================

 

 

 

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